Chris Dove
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Traumatic Brain Injury Attorney Practicing Nationwide

Many people who suffer a traumatic brain injury do not get the help they need. A traumatic brain injury (also called “TBI”) can be difficult to detect because it is not outwardly obvious that the brain has been injured. If you are in a car wreck and injure your arm, you and any doctor that sees you can correctly identify the injury. But an injury to your brain can be invisible to the outside world because it is hard to diagnose. But to the person suffering from a TBI, there can be no worse injury because it so profoundly diminishes your life. We are here to help. 

What Is a Traumatic Brain Injury

A traumatic brain injury happens due to a physical force that strikes a person's head or body. For example, trauma can occur because an object physically strikes the head. Or, a person could fall and his or her head could strike the ground. But brain injury can also occur because there is trauma to other parts of the body due to a car wreck or a truck wreck. A wreck can cause the body to move in a direction different than the person's head. Then, in a whiplash effect, the head snaps back or to the side and then follows the body. A brain can be described as floating inside a skull. When the head moves violently in one direction, the brain can be damaged by hitting the inside of skull or by damaging the brain's neurological pathways (axons and dendrites) or blood vessels. 

Symptoms of a Traumatic Brain Injury

The injuries from a traumatic brain injury can be difficult to detect, except for family and close friends. The types of injuries can include cognitive, behavioral, and neurological. Quite often a traumatic brain injury cannot be detected through imaging technology such as an MRI. But people who know the victim of a TBI can easily see how the person has been affected. 

Cognitive symptoms that result from a traumatic brain injury can include short-term memory loss, long-term memory loss, ongoing headaches, dizziness, difficulty concentrating or 'foggy brain', difficulty dealing with more than one task at a time and feeling easily overwhealmed, reading or speech difficulties, waking often throughout the night, and mental fatigue. 

Traumatic brain injury can also cause dramatic changes in behavior. For example, a person with a TBI could demonstrate what seem like shocking changes in personality or beliefs, become easily angered or sad, withdraw from family and friends, become aggressive or even demonstrate an absence of emotional response to situtions. Injury to the brain can also cause a normally cautious person to become wildly impulsive, irritable, and unstable.   

How Do Brain Injuries Occur

Traumatic brain injuries can happen because someone else is not careful or even reckless. For example, a TBI result from:

  • Car wreck
  • Semitruck collision
  • Delivery truck wreck
  • Motorcycle collision
  • Car crash into a bicyclist
  • Fall onto a hard surface or down stairs
  • An assault or violent attack
  • Sports injury

Did the other driver run a red light? Does the semitruck driver stay up all night trying to make it through the next state? Was the delivery driver behind schedule and rushing through traffic? Did someone fail to keep a look-out for a motorcyle or bicyclist? Was a store floor untended or dangerous? Were you the victim of a vicious attack? All of these situations can result in trauma to the brain either directly or indirectly. 

How We Can Help

Traumatic brain injuries require a specialized approach. They are not like a typical injury case. The person who harmed you or the insurance company is not going to listen to you. Instead, to get you the results you deserve, your case will require medical specialists and an attorney who understands the complex science of brain injuries. You or your loved one could need ongoing medical and care services to deal with a life that has been permanently changed by a traumatic brain injury. Contact us so we can help.